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War Museum of Nafplio

01.04.2016 in History

War Museum of Nafplio    The museum opened its doors to the public in 1988 and it is accommodated in a building that used to be a Military Academy, today it serves as an annex of the War Museum in Athens.     A thematic collection unfolds on the first floor where the vital role of Nafplio in the Greek Revolution of 1821 is illustrated; Ioannis Kapodistrias, first governor of Greece, and the history of the first Military Academy from 1828 until 1834. Exhibits also include the Greek Revolution of 1821, the Macedonians wars (1904-1908), the Balkan wars (1912-1913) and World War…

Seven Years of the Greek Military Junta: (1967-1974)

01.04.2016 in History

Seven Years of the Greek Military Junta: (1967-1974)    To understand what brought about the Junta in Greece, it is necessary to take a step back in history, back to the period following World War II, when civil war brought Greece to its knees, destroying everything and decimating the population in countless ways.     This civil war resulted in demonstrations, strikes, and riots almost daily. In 1947, in order to ensure that Greece, Turkey, and Iran did not fall under Soviet influence, the United States formulated the Truman Doctrine and began actively supporting a series of authoritarian governments. The civil war…

The National Historical Museum: Five Hundred Years of History

01.03.2016 in History

The National Historical Museum: Five Hundred Years of History    When speaking of Greece, the achievements and remains of antiquity are commonly more familiar to most.  But there is a place in the center of the modern Greek capital where visitors will find themselves before a more tangible history, one that reflects the trials and tribulations of Modern Greece…     When visiting the National Historical Museum in Athens, contemporary visitors will inevitably find themselves entranced with the great statue of Theodoros Kolokotronis. It is only fitting that his likeness should stand guard before this institution. Kolokotronis, a deeply loyal and moral man…

MARCH 25 1821: Freedom or Death

01.03.2016 in History

MARCH 25 1821: Freedom or Death    On March 25, 1821, Greece rose up against its oppressor, the Ottoman Empire, after almost 400 years of brutal occupation.  While the rest of Europe had flourished, this time in Greece is often referred to as the second Dark Ages.  The plight of Greece and the desire to support a country globally recognized as the foundation of Western Civilization spanned throughout Europe, across the ocean and over the United States.     In 1824, Daniel Webster presented a resolution in the US House of Representatives that would recognize the Independence of Greece.  A few…

Kerameikos, Today & in Antiquity

03.02.2016 in History

Kerameikos, Today & in Antiquity Is it possible to imagine that a small region in the heart of the contemporary city of Athens hides a place of incomparable beauty? It is this neighborhood that the historian Thucydides used to call κάλλιστον προάστιον, the “most beautiful of the Athenian suburbs.” Surrounded by modern buildings, bars, restaurants and art galleries, Kerameikos, gives visitors a glimpse at the conception of the historical and architectural endurance of Athens. Apart from being an “oasis” of serenity and tranquility amidst noisy and crowded streets, Kerameikos reveals a more diverse history: that of the living and the…

Under the Shade of the Mastic Tree, A Glimpse at the Rich History of Chios

02.02.2016 in History

Under the Shade of the Mastic Tree, A Glimpse at the Rich History of Chios The island of Chios is the fifth largest island in Greece, located in the Aegean Sea and six miles of the coast of Turkey. There is much to see, experience, and learn about the island and you’re sure to find something interesting about a speck in the Aegean Sea that isn’t as foreign as you may think. From the tourist seeking a diverse destination, to the visitor interested in history, humanities, arts or even science, everyone is sure to find something of interest within the…

Native Greek Horses: from Man- & Fish-eaters to Gaiters

25.01.2016 in History

Native Greek Horses: from Man- & Fish-eaters, BC, to DMRT3 Gaiters in Modern Times In an ongoing interdisciplinary collaborative research project of the Aristotle and Texas A&M Universities, ‘mythical’ or prehistoric data from the 3rd or 2nd millennium BC reported by Greek writers, historians and tragedians in classical times are elucidated by a new approach reflecting taming, domestication, zoogeography and evolution of Equus caballus in Greece, from Thrace to the Peloponnese. Man-eating horses: Myth or Myth-history? It is our belief that factual events in stories written by ancient writers and painted or sculpted on vases and reliefs by artists were…

Vrellis Museum: Wax Figures bring Greek History to Life

01.11.2015 in History

Vrellis Museum: Wax Figures bring Greek History to Life    There is nothing more vivid or impressive than wax effigies; these figures captivate your imagination because they represent famous or ordinary people as if they were real. Inspired by this “metamorphic power,” Pavlos Vrellis took the initiative to create a museum of Greek history, wherein he has installed wax figure as exhibits.     The museum is situated in a village called Bizani, located 12 kilometers outside the city of Ioannina, and is worth visiting as it offers an astonishing collection of more than 150 wax models in life size and 37 different…

The Ambiguous Interpretation of “Crisis”

01.11.2015 in History

The Ambiguous Interpretation of “Crisis”    Can crisis stand for something more than instability and insecurity? As life is not perceived in black and white, neither are words. Words can change coloration in the way they are interpreted. Let us examine this term in perspectives, the positive and the negative; because crisis may carry a negative burden but it could also be a synonym to verve, creative spirit and innovation.    Beginning with the negative side, crisis is defined as a sudden event, leading to intense changes in various aspects. These changes, having a negative nuance, usually cause a feeling of…

Aristotle on Man’s Divinity

01.11.2015 in History

Aristotle on Man’s Divinity    Being a graduate of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, I was not surprised by the fact that the great Greek philosopher [384-323 BC] and teacher of Alexander has been recognized at last-as the greatest personality in the 6,000-year history of man. Neither the MIT scientists who run the questionnaire nor any ‘’layman’’ should be surprised with its results, I think.     Why was Aristotle acclaimed as the most important human in history? Simple. The son of Nicomachos of Andros who was the physician of King Amyntas III of Macedon [393-369 BC], father of Philip and grandfather…