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The Golden Fruit: A Way of Life

13.01.2022 in Arts & Culture

The Golden Fruit: A Way of Life Welcome back to Politismos’s The Golden Fruit series! Last time, we looked at how the Ancient Greeks harvested olives. This week, we will examine some of the many way they used them! Throughout history, olive oil has been an inextricable part of Greek tradition and culture. Homer, the great poet and composer of the Iliad and the Odyssey, deemed olive oil a “Golden Liquid” and the olive the “Gold of the Ground,” as it is the olive that contributes to good health, warms the spirit and soul, and aids in the longevity of…

The Golden Fruit: The Harvest

30.12.2021 in Arts & Culture

The Golden Fruit: The Harvest Welcome to the second installment of Politismos’s The Golden Fruit article series! Last time, we introduced the mythical origins of Greece’s famous olive tree. This week, we’ll look at how the Ancient Greeks harvested its amazing bounty. In 2000 BCE, the Minoan civilization on the island of Crete was harvesting the olive tree for food, timber, firewood, and of course, olive oil. Today, the process of producing olive oil has remained largely the same since then: HARVEST, CRUSH, PRESS, SEPARATE Olive trees, much like the people of Greece, flourish in the golden sun, yet they…

The Golden Fruit: Athena’s Gift

16.12.2021 in Arts & Culture

The Golden Fruit: Athena’s Gift Olives. Where do we start? They’re delicious. They’re good for you. They’re loved all around the world! But to the Ancient Greeks, olives were so much more than a favorite snack—they were practically a way of life. Join Politismos as we explore the culinary, religious, and medicinal significance of olives to the Ancient Greeks. Today, we’ll start at the very beginning: at the story of how olives came to be.   Once upon a time… One day, the mighty gods of Olympus looked down and saw an exquisite spot of land in the heart of…

Amalia: A Queen’s Pattern for Greek Fashion

04.11.2021 in Arts & Culture

Amalia: A Queen’s Pattern for Greek Fashion In 1837, when Queen Amalia arrived from Bavaria to the new capital of the Greek State, she found the city of Athens to resemble an Ottoman province. 400 years of Turkish occupation had left a deep impact in Athenian society, and most definitely on Greek fashion. The Queen, though, was enthralled with the fashion of her time. A wise woman, she realized that must approach her “odd” new subjects in a tangible way: fashion. She created a romantic folklore costume.The ensemble was acknowledged in history as   “the Amalia costume” and today is acknowledged…

Evzone: Threading in Greek Valiance

04.11.2021 in Arts & Culture

Evzone: Threading in Greek Valiance   The Evzones are a special unit of the Greek Army. For over a century, they have been the most recognizable symbol of the Greek Presidential Guard.   The image of the Evzone is deeply significant to the Greek people. They stand as a symbol of national pride, as well as triumph over great tribulations. Hundreds of thousands of people have come from around the world to watch as Evzones stand guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Syntagma Square.   The word evzonas (Greek: εύζωνας) means “well-girt” and was first mentioned in…

Forged in Fire: An Interview with Panos Valsamakis, Ceramicist

26.04.2021 in Arts & Culture

Forged in Fire: An Interview with Panos Valsamakis, Ceramicist The Valsamakis family has been leaving its mark on the world of Greek pottery for three generations with its distinctive tradition of tile art. But how did this talented family get to where it is today? In an interview with Politismos, family head Panos Valsamakis describes his grandfather’s journey to ceramic mastery, and how it shaped their lives.   Q. How did you personally get your start working with ceramics? Our workshop was established in 1960 by my grandfather and I am the third generation. The workshop was part of our…

Gems of Wisdom: An Interview with Yannis Sergakis, Jewelry Designer

26.04.2021 in Arts & Culture

Gems of Wisdom: An Interview with Yannis Sergakis, Jewelry Designer Born into a family of diamond traders, Yannis Sergakis has spent his career designing world-class jewelry for buyers around the world. But his latest piece is something a bit closer to home for him- a porcelain fustanella, crafted in honor of the 200 year anniversary of Greek independence. In an interview with us, Yannis opens up about his art, his heritage, and his hopes for the future.   Q. What inspired you to create this piece? Greece has just marked the Bicentennial of the start of its Independence War, and…

13.07.2020 in Arts & Culture

George Tzimas, A Chromatic Revolutionist Degas said, “Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” Take a moment to see the art of George Tzimas and you will see a world of color, beauty and sheer joy. George Tzimas was born and raised in Athens. At the young age of 7, he began painting. Following his studies, he went on and received his fine ar ts ABC Diploma in France. With a spirit of humor and imagination, he began his artistic journey. Q. When did you realize you wanted to be an artist? I have always…

Interactive Musical Theatrical Performance for Children

15.02.2020 in Arts & Culture

  Toys and smudges at Carnival-Country A Carnival theatrical performance that is transformed into a great Carnival Party. All children are becoming one active team with actors and are traveling throughout Greece and abroad. Children are becoming familiar and are participating in funny customs, dances, games and songs.   Interactive Musical Theatrical Performance for Children “Carnival’s Puzzle” Can we have Carnival without colors, masks, dances and fun ? No way. No way. No way. “Carnival’s Puzzle” is an interactive theatrical performance, with full of imagination, games and fun. Children are assembling piece-by-piece the new Carnival-puzzle, they are solving the Carnival mystery…

Once upon the Lemon Tree, an interview with George Makris

12.01.2020 in Arts & Culture

Once upon the Lemon Tree, an interview with George Makris     Born in 1948 in Lesvos, George Makris graduated from “Pantion” University and also has a master degree (Politics) from NYU/NY and a PhD from Aristotelian University of Thessalonica (1996 in Social Demography).   He worked 30 years in the National Statistical Service and General Secretariat for Youth of Greece. From 1967-1974, George connected with musicians of the “new wave” trend. From 1997 to 2006 was a student of ecclesiastical music and a member of the choir “Protopsalton and Lambadarion”. In 2001, he established the rebetiko music group “Parapetamenoi”(neglected…